A plot overview of the story sir gawain and the green knight

The Green Knight proposes a game:

A plot overview of the story sir gawain and the green knight

Most good stories start with a fundamental list of ingredients: Great writers sometimes shake up the recipe and add some spice. Initial Situation Arthur and his knights have gathered at his castle for the Christmas holiday season, but Arthur has a custom of refusing to eat until he has heard a marvelous tale or witnessed a wonder.

Suddenly, an enormous, completely green man carrying a giant axe rides in on a completely green horse.

A plot overview of the story sir gawain and the green knight

The conflict is between his code of honor as a knight, which requires him to always keep his word, and his natural survival instinct. Complication Gawain spends the next holiday season at a mysterious castle in the middle of an enchanted forest. The lord of the castle proposes an exchange of winnings on the days when he goes hunting and Gawain lounges at home in bed.

Climax Gawain meets the Green Knight.

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It looks like his code of honor is going to win out over his survival instinct. The Green Knight really prolongs the suspense here, since he keeps putting off the critical moment when Gawain will get his head chopped off.

Denouement The Green Knight explains that he is actually Lord Bertilak, and that the feints represent the days on which Gawain honorably followed the rules of their exchange-of-winnings game, whereas the last stroke represents his dishonesty in withholding the magic girdle.

Wow, this is a lot of information to get all at once. Oh, and the old lady? Anyway, Green Knight and the connection between the complication and the conflict explained.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Summary from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes Arthur, however, refuses to eat until he has witnessed something marvelous or heard a great adventure story.

The knights of the round table decide to wear a similar belt in honor of Gawain, and it becomes a symbol of honor. In medieval romances, the conclusion almost always occurs when the knight-adventurer returns to the place where he began, usually the court of his king.Sir Gawain and the Green Knight study guide contains literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight is a chivalric romance written by an anonymous author sometime in the fourteenth century. It is one of the most famous stories of King Arthur and his knights with themes of honesty, bravery, and honor.

Gawain goes in search of the Green Knight at the appointed time, and it looks like all that’s left for him to do is die. Our story becomes more complicated, however, when Gawain comes upon a mysterious castle in the middle of the enchanted forest where he’s invited to spend the holiday season.

Complete summary of Pearl-Poet's Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Summary from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a chivalric romance that was written anonymously and first published in the late 14th century.

Summary. Bertilak promises to take Sir Gawain to the Green Chapel, the place of the confrontation, and there, Sir Gawain meets the Green Knight.

The Green Knight proposes a game: Any knight brave enough to strike off the Green Knight's head may keep the Green Knight's ax, but that man must accept a return stroke in one year. Gawain accepts the challenge and cuts off the Green Knight's head. So Sir Gawain volunteers himself. Gawain brings the axe down on the Green Knight, chopping his head off. Instead of dying, the Green Knight picks up his own head, turns it to face the court, and tells Gawain to meet him at the Green Chapel in a year and a day. Stunned, Arthur hesitates to respond, but when the Green Knight mocks Arthur’s silence, the king steps forward to take the challenge. As soon as Arthur grips the Green Knight’s axe, Sir Gawain leaps up and asks to take the challenge himself. He takes hold of the axe and, in .
SparkNotes: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Plot Overview